Edward Snowden’s father says FBI asked him to fly to Moscow

July 31, 2013 by  
Filed under Americas

The father of the whistleblower Edward Snowden has said the FBI tried to persuade him to fly to Moscow so that he could encourage his son to return to the United States.

“I said: ‘I want to be able to speak with my son … Can you set up communications?’ and it was ‘Well, we are not sure,'” Lon Snowden told the Washington Post. “I said: ‘Wait a minute, folks, I’m not going to sit on the tarmac to be an emotional tool for you.'”

Snowden’s father, who is retired from the US Coast Guard, also said he preferred Edward to remain in Russia, where he is stuck in the transit zone of Moscow’s Sheremetyevo airport while Russia considers his request for temporary asylum.

“If he comes back to the United States, he is going to be treated horribly. He is going to be thrown into a hole. He is not going to be allowed to speak.” The 52-year-old said he had been as “surprised as the rest of America” when his son, who worked for a contractor, was revealed as the source of the leaks about surveillance by the National Security Agency to the Guardian. “As a father it pains me what he did,” Snowden said. “I wish my son could simply have sat in Hawaii and taken the big paycheck, lived with his beautiful girlfriend and enjoyed paradise. But as an American citizen, I am absolutely thankful for what he did.”

Full Article

Sandy Hook Officer ignores Black Out: ‘There were probably two shooters’

July 30, 2013 by  
Filed under Featured

 

 27 Jul 2013

Courant

While law enforcement officials have released few details of the Dec. 14 Sandy Hook Elementary School massacre to Connecticut residents, state police and Newtown officers have increased their trips across the country, in some cases sharing graphic details of what they saw inside the school…

In March, Danbury State’s Attorney Stephen Sedensky, who will issue the final investigative [sic] report on the shooting, ordered police to stop discussing details of the investigation at conferences. In Orlando two weeks ago, about 800 law enforcement officers who attended a conference heard the first 10 minutes of the police dispatch tape from the morning of the school shooting played by officers Leonard Penna and Jason Flynn, according to accounts reported by the Daytona News Journal…

Sedensky has denied The Courant’s request to release the dispatch tape and 911 calls, saying they are part of the ongoing investigation. After playing the dispatch tape, Penna then graphically described for the audience what he saw that day, according to [media reports]. Penna told the group when he pulled into the parking lot he saw a black car with the passenger’s door wide open and two black jackets laid on the ground. Penna said that he assumed it was the shooter’s car and that since there were two jackets, there probably were two shooters. …He then entered into the first classroom and heard a shot. ‘My first thought was one of our guys shot him,’ he said.

Breaking: Bradley Manning acquitted of aiding the enemy / guilty on lesser charges

July 30, 2013 by  
Filed under Americas

He could be sentenced to up to 20 years behind bars on some of the other charges.

Manning already has spent three years in custody.

We Jail Heroes in the USA

Not Guilty of Aiding Enemy...
Guilty in slew of lesser charges...
Largest leak in US history...

FORT MEADE, Md. — U.S. Army Pfc. Bradley Manning has been acquitted of aiding the enemy for giving classified secrets to WikiLeaks.

The military judge hearing the case, Army Col. Denise Lind, announced the verdict Tuesday. The charge was the most serious of 21 counts. It carried a possible life sentence without parole.

Manning was convicted of five espionage counts, five theft charges, a computer fraud charge and other military infractions.

Manning’s sentencing hearing is set to begin Wednesday.

The 25-year-old Crescent, Okla., native acknowledged giving the anti-secrecy website hundreds of thousands of battlefield reports, diplomatic cables and videos in early 2010.

Manning said he didn’t believe the information would harm troops in Afghanistan and Iraq or threaten national security.

Read more: Washington Times

Democratic establishment unmasked: prime defenders of NSA bulk spying

July 30, 2013 by  
Filed under Police State

NYT: “The Obama administration made common cause with the House Republican leadership”

Michele Bachmann

One of the most vocal supporters of the Obama White House’s position on yesterday’s NSA debate: GOP Congresswoman Michele Bachmann of Minnesota. Photograph: Scott Olson/Getty Images

One of the worst myths Democratic partisans love to tell themselves – and everyone else – is that the GOP refuses to support President Obama no matter what he does. Like its close cousin – the massively deceitful inside-DC grievance that the two parties refuse to cooperate on anything – it’s hard to overstate how false this Democratic myth is. When it comes to foreign policy, war, assassinations, drones, surveillance, secrecy, and civil liberties, President Obama’s most stalwart, enthusiastic defenders are often found among the most radical precincts of the Republican Party.

The rabidly pro-war and anti-Muslim GOP former Chairman of the House Homeland Security Committee, Peter King, has repeatedly lavished Obama with all sorts of praise and support for his policies in those areas. The Obama White House frequently needs, and receives, large amounts of GOP Congressional support to have its measures enacted or bills its dislikes defeated. The Obama DOJ often prevails before the US Supreme Court solely because the Roberts/Scalia/Thomas faction adopts its view while the Ginsburg/Sotomayor/Breyer faction rejects it (as happened in February when the Court, by a 5-4 ruling, dismissed a lawsuit brought by Amnesty and the ACLU which argued that the NSA‘s domestic warrantless eavesdropping activities violate the Fourth Amendment; the Roberts/Scalia wing accepted the Obama DOJ’s argument that the plaintiffs lack standing to sue because the NSA successfully conceals the identity of which Americans are subjected to the surveillance). As Wired put it at the time about that NSA ruling:

The 5-4 decision by Justice Samuel Alito was a clear victory for the President Barack Obama administration, which like its predecessor, argued that government wiretapping laws cannot be challenged in court.”

The extraordinary events that took place in the House of Representatives yesterday are perhaps the most vivid illustration yet of this dynamic, and it independently reveals several other important trends. The House voted on an amendment sponsored by Justin Amash, the young Michigan lawyer elected in 2010 as a Tea Party candidate, and co-sponsored by John Conyers, the 24-term senior Democrat on the House Judiciary Committee. The amendment was simple. It would de-fund one single NSA program: the agency’s bulk collection of the telephone records of all Americans that we first revealed in this space, back on June 6. It accomplished this “by requiring the FISA court under Sec. 215 [of the Patriot Act] to order the production of records that pertain only to a person under investigation“.

The amendment yesterday was defeated. But it lost by only 12 votes: 205-217. Given that the amendment sought to de-fund a major domestic surveillance program of the NSA, the very close vote was nothing short of shocking. In fact, in the post-9/11 world, amendments like this, which directly challenge the Surveillance and National Security States, almost never get votes at all. That the GOP House Leadership was forced to allow it to reach the floor was a sign of how much things have changed over the last seven weeks.

More significant than the closeness of the vote was its breakdown. A majority of House Democrats supported the Amash/Conyers amendment, while a majority of Republicans voted against it:

roll call 

The full roll call vote is here. House Speaker John Boehner saved the Obama White House by voting against it and ensuring that his top leadership whipped against it. As the New York Times put it in its account of yesterday’s vote:

Conservative Republicans leery of what they see as Obama administration abuses of power teamed up with liberal Democrats long opposed to intrusive intelligence programs. The Obama administration made common cause with the House Republican leadership to try to block it.

In reality, the fate of the amendment was sealed when the Obama White House on Monday night announced its vehement opposition to it, and then sent NSA officials to the House to scare members that barring the NSA from collecting all phone records of all Americans would Help The Terrorists™.

Using Orwellian language so extreme as to be darkly hilarious, this was the first line of the White House’s statement opposing the amendment: “In light of the recent unauthorized disclosures, the President has said that he welcomes a debate about how best to simultaneously safeguard both our national security and the privacy of our citizens” (i.e.: we welcome the debate that has been exclusively enabled by that vile traitor, the same debate we’ve spent years trying to prevent with rampant abuse of our secrecy powers that has kept even the most basic facts about our spying activities concealed from the American people).

The White House then condemned Amash/Conyers this way: “This blunt approach is not the product of an informed, open, or deliberative process.” What a multi-level masterpiece of Orwellian political deceit that sentence is. The highly surgical Amash/Conyers amendment – which would eliminate a single, specific NSA program of indiscriminate domestic spying – is a “blunt approach”, but the Obama NSA’s bulk, indiscriminate collection of all Americans’ telephone records is not a “blunt approach”. Even worse: Amash/Conyers – a House bill debated in public and then voted on in public – is not an “open or deliberative process”, as opposed to the Obama administration’s secret spying activities and the secret court that blesses its secret interpretations of law, which is “open and deliberative”. That anyone can write a statement like the one that came from the Obama White House without dying of shame, or giggles, is impressive.

Even more notable than the Obama White House’s defense of the NSA’s bulk domestic spying was the behavior of the House Democratic leadership. Not only did they all vote against de-funding the NSA bulk domestic spying program – that includes liberal icon House Democratic leader Nancy Pelosi, who voted to protect the NSA’s program – but Pelosi’s deputy, Steny Hoyer, whipped against the bill by channeling the warped language and mentality of Dick Cheney. This is the language the Democratic leadership circulated when telling their members to reject Amash/Conyers:

“2) Amash/Conyers/Mulvaney/Polis/Massie Amendment – Bars the NSA and other agencies from using Section 215 of the Patriot Act (as codified by Section 501 of FISA) to collect records, including telephone call records, that pertain to persons who may be in communication with terrorist groups but are not already subject to an investigation under Section 215.”

Remember when Democrats used to object so earnestly when Dick Cheney would scream “The Terrorists!” every time someone tried to rein in the National Security State just a bit and so modestly protect basic civil liberties? How well they have learned: now, a bill to ban the government from collecting the telephone records of all Americans, while expressly allowing it to collect the records of anyone for whom there is evidence of wrongdoing, is – in the language of the House Democratic Leadership – a bill to Protect The Terrorists.

None of this should be surprising. Remember: this is the same Nancy Pelosi who spent years during the Bush administration pretending to be a vehement opponent of the illegal Bush NSA warrantless eavesdropping program after it was revealed by the New York Times, even though (just as was true of the Bush torture program) she was secretly briefed on it many years earlier when it was first implemented. At the end of June, we published the top secret draft report by the Inspector General’s office of the NSA that was required to provide a comprehensive history of the NSA warrantless eavesdropping program secretly ordered by Bush in late 2001. That report included this passage:

“Within the first 30 days of the Program, over 190 people were cleared into the Program. This number included Senators Robert Graham and Richard Shelby, Congresswoman Nancy Pelosi, President George W. Bush, Vice President Richard Cheney, Counsel to the Vice President David Addington, and Presidential Assistant I. Lewis ‘Scooter’ Libby.”

So the history of Democratic leaders such as Nancy Pelosi isn’t one of opposition to mass NSA spying when Bush was in office, only to change positions now that Obama is. The history is of pretend opposition – of deceiving their supporters by feigning opposition – while actually supporting it.

But the most notable aspect of yesterday’s events was the debate on the House floor. The most vocal defenders of the Obama White House’s position were Rep. Mike Rogers, the very hawkish GOP Chairman of the House Intelligence Committee, and GOP Congresswoman Michele Bachmann. Echoing the Democratic House leadership, Bachmann repeatedly warned that NSA bulk spying was necessary to stop “Islamic jihadists”, and she attacked Republicans who supported de-funding for rendering the nation vulnerable to The Terrorists.

Meanwhile, Amash led the debate against the NSA program and repeatedly assigned time to many of the House’s most iconic liberals to condemn in the harshest terms the NSA program defended by the Obama White House. Conyers repeatedly stood to denounce the NSA program as illegal, unconstitutional and extremist. Manhattan’s Jerry Nadler said that “no administration should be permitted to operate beyond the law, as they’ve been doing”. Newly elected Democrat Tulsi Gabbard of Hawaii, an Iraq War combat veteran considered a rising star in her party, said that she could not in good conscience take a single dollar from taxpayers to fund programs that infringe on exactly those constitutional rights our troops (such as herself) have risked their lives for; she told me after the vote, by Twitter direct message, that the “battle [was] lost today but war not over. We will continue to press on this issue.”

In between these denunciations of the Obama NSA from House liberals, some of the most conservative members of the House stood to read from the Fourth Amendment. Perhaps the most amazing moment came when GOP Rep. James Sensenbrenner – the prime author of the Patriot Act back in 2001 and a long-time defender of War on Terror policies under both Bush and Obama – stood up to say that the NSA’s domestic bulk spying far exceeds the bounds of the law he wrote as well as his belief in the proper limits of domestic surveillance, and announced his support for Amash/Conyers. Sensenbrenner was then joined in voting to de-fund the NSA program by House liberals such as Barbara Lee, Rush Holt, James Clyburn, Nydia Velázquez, Alan Grayson, and Keith Ellison.

Meanwhile, in the Senate, Democrat Ron Wyden continues to invoke unusually harsh language to condemn what the NSA is doing under Obama. Here is some of what he said in a speech this week at the Center for American Progress, as reported by the Hill:

Sen. Ron Wyden (D-Ore.) on Tuesday urged the United States to revamp its surveillance laws and practices, warning that the country will ‘live to regret it’ if it fails to do so.

“‘If we do not seize this unique moment in our constitutional history to reform our surveillance laws and practices, we will all live to regret it . . . The combination of increasingly advanced technology with a breakdown in the checks and balances that limit government action could lead us to a surveillance state that cannot be reversed,’ he added. . . .

“The government has essentially kept people in the dark about their broad interpretations of the law, he said. Wyden tells constituents there are two Patriot Acts: One they read online at home and ‘the secret interpretation of the law that the government is actually relying upon.’

“‘If Americans are not able to learn how their government is interpreting and executing the law then we have effectively eliminated the most important bulwark of our democracy,” he said. . . .

“‘This means that the government’s authority to collect information on law-abiding American citizens is essentially limitless’, he said.”

Wyden’s full speech – in which he makes clear that it is solely the disclosures of the last seven weeks that have enabled this debate and brought about a massive shift in public opinion – is remarkable and can be read here. That’s a senior Democrat and a member of the Senate Intelligence Committee sounding exactly like Edward Snowden – and the ACLU – in denouncing the abuses of the American Surveillance State. Meanwhile, as soon as the House vote was over, Rep. Rush Holt, a long-time Democratic member of the House Intelligence Committee, introduced “The Surveillance State Repeal Act” that would repeal the legislative foundation for this massive spying, including the once-and-now-again-controversial Patriot Act, which the Obama administration in 2011 successfully had renewed without a single reform (after Democrat Harry Reid accused opponents of its reform-free renewal of endangering the Nation to The Terrorists).

To say that there is a major sea change underway – not just in terms of surveillance policy but broader issues of secrecy, trust in national security institutions, and civil liberties – is to state the obvious. But perhaps the most significant and enduring change will be the erosion of the trite, tired prism of partisan simplicity through which American politics has been understood over the last decade. What one sees in this debate is not Democrat v. Republican or left v. right. One sees authoritarianism v. individualism, fealty to The National Security State v. a belief in the need to constrain and check it, insider Washington loyalty v. outsider independence.

That’s why the only defenders of the NSA at this point are the decaying establishment leadership of both political parties whose allegiance is to the sprawling permanent power faction in Washington and the private industry that owns and controls it. They’re aligned against long-time liberals, the new breed of small government conservatives, the ACLU and other civil liberties groups, many of their own members, and increasingly the American people, who have grown tired of, and immune to, the relentless fear-mongering.

The sooner the myth of “intractable partisan warfare” is dispelled, the better. The establishment leadership of the two parties collaborate on far more than they fight. That is a basic truth that needs to be understood. As John Boehner joined with Nancy Peolsi, as Eric Cantor whipped support for the Obama White House, as Michele Bachmann and Peter King stood with Steny Hoyer to attack NSA critics as Terrorist-Lovers, yesterday was a significant step toward accomplishing that.

Outgoing DHS head Janet Napolitano (Big Sis’) Shockingly Dirty Secrets Go Public

July 30, 2013 by  
Filed under Police State

Do Not let Ray Kelly nor any other fiend get the job at DHS. Call, write, post…. (for the sake of continuity, and to save money on the change over after Janet leaves the post) JUDGE ANDREW NAPOLITANO FOR NEW DHS HEAD! End the DHS!

WND

Democrats and Republicans largely heaped praise upon Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano after she announced she would resign her post later in the year, but a longtime constitutional attorney says there is not much to applaud – especially for anyone concerned about preserving freedom and limiting government intrusion in their lives.

“What the Department of Homeland Security became under Janet Napolitano is this monstrous surveillance and very intimidating group,” said Rutherford Institute President John Whitehead, a constitutional attorney for the past 40 years and author of “A Government of Wolves: The Emerging American Police State.”

“I think originally there were some good intentions with the Department of Homeland Security, but what happened under President Obama is that it accelerated rapidly,” Whitehead told WND. “I criticized George Bush’s policies. Under President Obama, we’re zooming.”

Whitehead said the Napolitano legacy of reducing freedom is evident across the board, starting in early 2009 when the department issued a report listing returning soldiers as one of the greatest threats to American security.

“Another program Napolitano set up is Operation Vigilant Eagle, which is a surveillance system done on all returning veterans from overseas, where they watch Facebook posts, text messages, emails of returning veterans to see if they’re going to be disgruntled,” Whitehead said. “There are quite a few disgruntled veterans. In fact, one that we helped just filed a major lawsuit against the Department of Homeland Security.”

“They arrived one day at his door, arrested him and actually put him in a mental institution for his Facebook posts criticizing the government. We got him out and then we sued the government,” Whitehead said.

Another outrage, according to Whitehead, is the harassment of Americans living on or somewhat near our national borders with Mexico and Canada. He said law-abiding citizens have been forced to hand over their laptops while the government officials download the information. The Rutherford Institute has also received reports of Americans being removed from their cars and searched without probable cause.

These allegations, and criticism of drone use near the borders, come as Congress hotly debate immigration reform legislation. Whitehead said the problems he’s talking about have nothing to do with border security.

“The people coming over from Mexico are not coming over at checkpoints. Incredibly stupid, and that’s where a lot of emphasis has been placed,” Whitehead said. “Obviously, they’re not focused in the right direction. They put drones on the border but the drones obviously have not been very effective. In fact, what we found out about those drones now, on the Canadian border, turned the drones in. They’re flying inland, photographing and watching what American citizens are doing and surveillance on American towns.”

Whitehead said that sort of activity will only get more common and more intrusive until the American people stand up and refuse to accept what he considers a major infringement on our constitutional liberties.

“Drones are coming in 2015. They’re going to be awesome. They’ll have scanning devices, rubber bullets, sound cannons. They can look through the walls of your home,” Whitehead said. “They’re just going to bypass the Fourth Amendment, and they already are doing that.”

A change at the top of DHS doesn’t give Whitehead any hope that the government will rein in its activities. He says potential replacements, like New York City Police Commissioner Ray Kelly, will likely be no different from Napolitano.

Read more at WND
NOooooooooooooooooooooooooooo

Black Caucus pushes Sheila Jackson Lee for ‘Homeland Security’ post

The Street Angle, The Straight Anglo and The Real Fight Club

July 30, 2013 by  
Filed under Commentary

 

By Ethan Indigo Smith

 

One of the best lessons I ever learned as a youth in NYC was to pay attention and to differentiate what I call the street angle and the straight Anglo.  My first lesson of differentiation was perhaps the starkest, but through it I came to understand that a lot of people refuse to believe what is obvious to others, many prefer formality over truth.  I was about 12 when I moved to Manhattan and I remember being warned by the older kids on the block to stay away from Catholic priests.  Back then nobody was talking about it, nobody wanted to address it, priests were getting transferred to keep it quiet and probably mad different people faced confrontation in ways we don’t know for trying to reveal rampant priest pedophilia.  But the streets knew a long time before I moved to the block.

At the time if someone told the wrong person about how Catholic priests were abusing kids, there could be trouble.  Tell the wrong straight Anglo, institutionalized, dare I say brainwashed person, no matter what color they are and they will lose it.  But on the streets, you could speak openly and freely warn your peers.  No matter what people believe the truth is the truth.

What are the unmentionables today among the straight Anglo celebrators of formality?  What are the streets talking about, on an international level, today, that the straight Anglo won’t touch?  To sum it up: corruption of corporate and government oligarchical collectives ravaging human rights and destroying Earth Mother in ways that equate to war on humanity and creation itself.  The street angle knows first, always.  And being on the street, aware of the melting pot mix, the street angle realize that not all priests are evil and not all corporate/government oligarchical collectives screw people all the time, but they know it happens often enough that they ought to say so.

The main part of the street angle is paying attention.  And no matter how you can demonstrate the philosophy of looking before leaping or explain how to read your surroundings people have to learn through experience.  The first thing though, to be a street angle veteran is shedding the straight Anglo societal training we all have.  It’s like this: in Japan, the first step in ninja training was untraining.  People are trained to react in certain ways and ninja can use that to one’s advantage.  And when you drop trained reactions you can see with your own eyes, you can predict what people are going to do by understanding their training and predictable reactions.  In martial arts it means always being a move or two ahead.  As applied societally one needs to only understand the recent study suggesting people who swear tend to be more honest than people who don’t.  Liars use clean language, whereas the truth can arrive in unclean language and not be detracted at all.  On the streets you hear things like, ‘war is fucked, fuck war.  Fuck the military industrial complex Eisenhower warned us about.’  But you just can’t say things like that in straight Anglo institutions.  You can’t just say, ‘Fuck war’ or ‘fuck nuclear experimentation’ even though the situation is plenty dire and drastic enough to justify any and all expletives.

http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/hide-and-seek/201205/hell-yes-the-7-best-reasons-swearing

The best warning I ever got was related to molesters, look out for the straight Anglo, the westernized and institutionalized, no matter color or creed they are, no matter what uniform they’re wearing.  When there is a canyon of discrepancy between what the streets talk about and what trained people believe you start to pay attention.  I learned a lot of lessons that cost me a pound of flesh and a pound of cash in the school of hard knocks.  And you either walk lightly and stand firmly and pay attention to learn or walk through and get pushed into gauntlets where you still learn, only in a more costly manner.

Everybody wants to graduate the school of hard knocks, but nobody wants to enroll.  One way to learn how to pay attention, besides enrolling in the school of hard knocks is a game, like a fight club.  From what I understand it’s straight out of Harlem.  There is no other game that will make you aware and pay attention like Spike Bad Habit.  The game was designed by New York City children in the nuclear era, so you know it’s violent.  But compared to building weaponry, polluting the world and the whole war economy it’s pretty tame.

Spike Bad Habit is simple and yet is part of why New Yorkers are able to read you up and down just by how you walk or talk.  You have to bet in the game and be bet out.  That means you have to shake hands to make a deal to start or stop the game, otherwise you are always playing, 24/7.  Whenever you sit down you have to say ‘Spike.’  And whenever you curse you have to say ‘Bad Habit.’  If you do not say Spike after sitting or Bad Habit after swearing you are punched until you do.  This can lead to great hilarity as you are only allowing to punch arms and legs, moments where people brain fart and are hit without saying anything and conversations that go something like: ‘yo I know Monsanto be doing some evil ass shit –Bad Habit, with that rogue fucking–Bad Habit, wheat and yo the cops is out here busting fucking weed heads –Bad Habit, yo.  What the fuck yo?  -Bad Habit.’

And in the end when the game is over, when everybody is over it, a veteran Spike Bad Habit player is not only aware of what they do and say, but they can spot somebody about to sit down three blocks away and can listen to somebody talk and tell when they’re about to curse.  But more than that, Spike Bad Habit makes you hyper aware, where you could tell if somebody’s lying by how they talk and if they are a liar by how they walk.  The street angle has long been aware that swearing is demonstrative of honesty if anything, while clean and intellectual language is the best sort for covering up some bullshit.  –Bad Habit.

 

Ethan Indigo, author of The Terraist Letters and The Matrix of Four among other works, will be on Conspiracy This Week with Dave Boyle discussing writing and current events without FCC restrictions.  Listen or call in: http://www.blogtalkradio.com/conspiracy-this-week/2013/08/03/conspiracy-this-week-07192013

“Fake Cops” Robbing Detroit Citizens At Gunpoint Turn Out To Be Real Cops Robbing Citizens At Gunpoint

July 30, 2013 by  
Filed under Police State

 

Chris | InformationLiberation

A string of robberies by people “dressed as police” led the people of Detroit to believe there were “fake cops” out robbing people at gunpoint, it turns out they were “not fake after all,” MyFoxDetroit reports:

DETROIT (WJBK) – A second officer, a 17-year veteran from Saint Clair Shores, has been arrested accused of robbing unsuspecting drivers at gunpoint.

On Saturday, Fox 2 also reported a Detroit police sergeant was arrested at the 12th precinct. A tip sent to Fox 2 helped lead to the arrests. We forwarded a photo from one scene to Detroit Police. They recognized one of their own in the photo.

More information is expected Monday during a press conference scheduled for Monday at 3 p.m.

The first incident took place at a Citgo gas station near French and I-94 on Detroit’s east side last Sunday. The clerk says two white men in a black Ford F-150 with police lights allegedly pistol-whipped customers pumping gas. The men stole cash and cell phones from their victims. A warning went out to be on the lookout for “fake cops” but it turns out those officers were not fake after all. It appears the sergeant in this case was driving his personal vehicle.

There were at least two reports of men posing as police officers and robbing unsuspecting drivers at gunpoint. The men had police badges, bullet proof vests and guns. They looked very official and police considered them armed and dangerous.

A second incident happened near Harper and 3 Mile Drive. A man says he was pulled over by three men in a unmarked Crown Victoria. The man was searched and while he answered questions, his wallet and CDs were stolen.

So, what can you do? Even police say you have permission not to stop if you don’t believe a real police officer is trying to pull you over. Instead, call 911 and ask the dispatcher for assistance. If all else fails, drive to the nearest precinct.

I like this advice, that is if the police actually tolerate it (which I find it hard to believe they would). I wonder how much revenue they could extract if every tax-slave being pulled over drove all the way to the nearest precinct to check-in.

While these cops who robbed people at gunpoint acting in an unofficial capacity have been caught, real police who do the same in their official capacity through traffic-ticket extortion will remain at large.
_
Chris runs the website InformationLiberation.com, you can read more of his writings here. Follow infolib on twitter here.

New JFK documentary alleges there WAS a second shooter in the assassination… and he was a Secret Service agent who shot the president by ACCIDENT

July 29, 2013 by  
Filed under Americas

Many conspiracy theorists unhappy with the official account of the assassination of John F. Kennedy have pointed to evidence they believe shows that the president was shot twice, from different directions.

Now a new documentary has come up with a new twist on the conspiracy theory, claiming that a Secret Service agent was the man who fired that shot… by accident.

JFK: The Smoking Gun claims that George Hickey, a Secret Service man riding in the car behind Kennedy, accidentally fired his weapon on November 22, 1963.

It alleges that a cover-up was then carried out to save the blushes of the agency whose main role is to protect serving and former U.S. leaders – leaving the many loose ends that have long raised suspicions.

It is said that as much as 75 per cent of the American public do not believe the official account of the Kennedy assassination.

Sammy Yatim: Latest in a long line of Toronto police shooting deaths

July 29, 2013 by  
Filed under Police State

Sammy Yatim, an 18-year-old shot dead by Toronto police during a confrontation early Saturday morning, is the latest fatality that calls into question police tactics and training.

Yatim, who was wielding a knife on an empty TTC streetcar, died in a hail of bullets early Saturday morning. A witness video captured nine shots fired by police in 13 seconds.

Early accounts indicate that Yatim was ordered by police to drop the knife and refused.

Unlike some other notable cases, the teen had never shown any signs of mental illness or violence, his family said.

Full Article

WWII Internment Camp Discovered In Mountains Of Idaho

July 29, 2013 by  
Filed under Commentary

Because we know how you love FDR!


 

HuffPo

– Deep in the mountains of northern Idaho, miles from the nearest town, lies evidence of a little-known portion of a shameful chapter of American history.

There are no buildings, signs or markers to indicate what happened at the site 70 years ago, but researchers sifting through the dirt have found broken porcelain, old medicine bottles and lost artwork identifying the location of the first internment camp where the U.S. government used people of Japanese ancestry as a workforce during World War II.

Today, a team of researchers from the University of Idaho wants to make sure the Kooskia Internment Camp isn’t forgotten to history.

“We want people to know what happened, and make sure we don’t repeat the past,” said anthropology professor Stacey Camp, who is leading the research.

It’s an important mission, said Charlene Mano-Shen of the Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience in Seattle.

Mano-Shen said her grandfather was forced into a camp near Missoula, Mont., during WWII, and some of the nation’s responses to the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11 evoked memories of the Japanese internments. Muslims, she said Thursday, “have been put on FBI lists and detained in the same way my grandfather was.”

After the surprise attack on Pearl Harbor plunged the nation into the second world war, about 120,000 people of Japanese heritage who lived on the West Coast were sent to internment camps. Nearly two-thirds were American citizens, and many were children. In many cases, people lost everything they had worked for in the U.S. and were sent to prison camps in remote locations with harsh climates.

Research such as the archaeological work underway at Kooskia (KOO’-ski) is vital to remembering what happened, said Janis Wong, director of communications for the Japanese American National Museum in Los Angeles.

People need to be able “to physically see and visit the actual camp locations,” Wong said.

Giant sites where thousands of people were held – such as Manzanar in California, Heart Mountain in Wyoming and Minidoka in Idaho – are well-known. But Camp said even many local residents knew little about the tiny Kooskia camp, which operated from 1943 to the end of the war and held more than 250 detainees about 30 miles east of its namesake small town, and about 150 miles southeast of Spokane, Wash.

The camp was the first place where the government used detainees as a labor crew, putting them into service doing road work on U.S. Highway 12, through the area’s rugged mountains.

“They built that highway,” Camp said of the road that links Lewiston, Idaho, and Missoula, Mont.

Men from other camps volunteered to come to Kooskia because they wanted to stay busy and make a little money by working on the highway, Camp said. As a result, the population was all male, and mostly made up of more recent immigrants from Japan who were not U.S. citizens, she said.

Workers could earn about $50 to $60 a month for their labor, said Priscilla Wegars of Moscow, Idaho, who has written books about the Kooskia camp.

Kooskia was one of several camps operated by the Immigration and Naturalization Service that also received people of Japanese ancestry rounded up from Latin American countries, mostly Peru, Camp said. But it was so small and so remote that it never achieved the notoriety of the massive camps that held about 10,000 people each.

“I’m aware of it, but I don’t know that much about it,” said Frank Kitamoto, president of the Bainbridge Island Japanese American Memorial Committee, based in Puget Sound, Wash., which works to maintain awareness of the camps.

After the war the camp was dismantled and largely forgotten. Using money from a series of grants, Camp in 2010 started the first archaeological work at the site. Some artifacts, such as broken china and buttons, were scattered on top of the ground, she said.

“To find stuff on the surface that has not been looted is rare,” she said.

Camp figures her work at the site could last another decade. Her team wants to create an accurate picture of the life of a detainee. She also wants to put signs up to show people where the internment camp was located.

Artifacts found so far include Japanese porcelain trinkets, dental tools and gambling pieces, she said. They have also found works of art created by internees.

“While it was a horrible experience, the people who lived in these camps resisted in interesting ways,” she said. “People in the camps figured out creative ways to get through this period of time.”

“They tried to make this place home,” she said.

 

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