Live anthrax shipped across states, to S. Korea ‘by accident’ – Pentagon

Live anthrax ‘inadvertently’ sent by U.S. military | 28 May 2015 | Four Defense Department workers in the United States and up to 22 overseas have been put in post-exposure treatment, a defense official said, following the revelation the U.S. military ‘inadvertently’ shipped live anthrax samples in the past several days. CNN learned on Wednesday a Maryland-based lab received the live samples, which prompted an across-the-board urgent review to see whether any other live anthrax has been shipped. Officials are concerned because samples left over at the lab in Dugway, Utah, where the samples originated, were tested and determined to contain live agent. Pentagon spokesman, Col. Steve Warren, said one sample was also sent to the Joint United States Forces Korea Portal and Integrated Threat Recognition Program at Osan Air Base. [A drill gone live?]

Live anthrax shipped across states, to S. Korea ‘by accident’ – Pentagon | 28 May 2015 | The Pentagon says that live anthrax was ‘inadvertently’ shipped across state lines from a military lab in Utah to nine other states and a military base in South Korea. However, a Department of Defense spokesperson says the public is not at risk. [?!?] One unnamed US official also told Reuters that anthrax samples were being shipped out from two military facilities for over a year, from March 2014 to April 2015. These samples were mistakenly marked inactive, the official said. While the anthrax samples were first moved out of Dugway Proving Ground in Utah, they were later shipped from Edgewood Chemical Biological Center in Maryland to federal, private and academic facilities. 

Army chief ‘99.9 percent’ confident no one was harmed by anthrax

From 2014:

Anthrax Accident: CDC Workers Exposed to Deadly Bacteria

Post 911 (initially Bin Laden)

THE 9/11 ANTHRAX FRAME-UP – WHAT REALLY HAPPENED

Excuses….

Seven Years Later: Electrons Unlocked Post-9/11 Anthrax Mail Mystery

Investigating the Investigators
Congress has called for an investigation of the FBI’s work on the anthrax case. One major misstep was revealed Tuesday, when the Los Angeles Times reported that Peter Jahrling, a former senior civilian scientist at the Fort Detrick facility, admitted that he had made an “honest mistake” seven years ago when he told top FBI brass that he believed anthrax spores he examined had been altered to make them more deadly

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