SEN John McCain asked about free fall of Building 7 on TV

April 12, 2013 by  
Filed under Commentary

A 9/11 Free Fall
Original Story–4/11/13
By Andrew Steele

On April 9th, 2013 Senator John McCain appeared on C-SPAN’s live call-in show Washington Journal. Identifying myself under a pseudonym, I asked him the following question:

“The National Institute of Standards and Technology asserts that the collapse of the 47-story World Trade Center Building 7 on 9/11 was caused by fire. Yet they acknowledge that the first 100 feet of that collapse took place at free-fall acceleration. Engineers will tell you that fire cannot do this, that the only method by which it can be accomplished is the use of pre-planted explosives.

How do you explain this discrepancy…of a hundred feet of free-fall, without the use of explosives?”

As the video shows, John McCain claimed ignorance, saying, “To tell you the truth, this is an area that I’m not very familiar…and if you would drop me a note and mention that we talked on C-SPAN, I’d be glad to get you a more complete answer. But…honestly, every once in a while I have to plead ignorance about an issue and this is one that I have not been involved in, but I’ll be more than happy to look into it…”

John McCain, of course, is not ignorant of 9/11 Truth. He wrote the forward for the Popular Mechanics book “Debunking 9/11 Myths: Why Conspiracy Theories Can’t Stand Up to the Facts”. In his essay “9/11 Conspiracy Myths: Truth Under Attack” which was adapted from his foreward for Popular Mechanics’ book, McCain wrote:

“Any explanation for 9/11 must start and end with the facts. The evidence must be gathered and analyzed. Then—only then—can conclusions be drawn.”

Indeed, 100 feet of free-fall acceleration of WTC 7 is a fact, as acknowledged by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), which was the government agency tasked with investigating the destruction of the building. NIST was forced to admit to WTC 7′s free-fall after physics teacher David Chandler embarrassed the agency at a technical briefing in August of 2008.

As well, NIST has refused requests to disclose the data used to create its computer models for its WTC7 investigation, claiming that doing so would somehow jeopardize public safety.

It’s likely that John McCain’s plea of ignorance on Washington Journal was in reference to the technical information cited in the question that I asked him and not to 9/11 Truth in general.

In regards to the controversial issue of WTC 7′s destruction, he should be quite familiar with the topic.

In 2008 Blair Gadsby– a religious history professor and constituent of McCain’s– held a hunger strike for 17 days at McCain’s Phoenix office after failing to obtain a personal meeting with the Senator to discuss his concerns about the 9/11 crime. Richard Gage, AIA– CEO and founder of Architects and Engineers for 9/11 Truth– offered his immediate availability to Senator McCain to discuss the evidence. Though a member of McCain’s staff finally met with Gadsby and other 9/11 activists after nine days into Gadsby’s hunger strike, and the staff member was given materials that laid out the evidence of the Twin Towers and Building 7′s controlled demolition on 9/11, Senator McCain himself refused to meet with the activists personally, stating in a letter to Gadsby:

I believe these investigations have been conducted in good faith by qualified experts who have approached this daunting task honestly and objectively. My staff and I are always open to new, scientifically substantiated information that helps explain how and why the tragedies of September 11th occurred. I welcome any additional new information you may wish to present on the subject and will make my staff available to listen to your concerns.”

Because NIST’s acknowledgement of WTC 7′s free-fall took place after McCain wrote those words to Gadsby, it qualifies as the “new, scientifically substantiated information” McCain was seeking. McCain promised on Washington Journal that he would try to answer the question that I asked him. Based on his promise and the existence of the new evidence, John McCain’s office should, therefore, be open to a new meeting with supporters of Architects and Engineers for 9/11 Truth and a personal re-examination of the evidence.

Read MORE
 

Business lobby moves to criminalize filming animal abuse on factory farms

March 19, 2013 by  
Filed under Police State

Bills being shopped in six states by the American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC) would make it a crime to film animal abuse at factory farms or lie on job applications, in hopes of shutting down animal rights activists who infiltrate slaughterhouses to expose ghastly conditions.

“The meat industry’s response to these exposes has not been to try to prevent these abuses from taking place, but rather it’s really just been to prevent Americans from finding out about those abuses in the first place,” Paul Shapiro, spokesperson for the Humane Society of the United States (HSUS), told Raw Story. “What they’re doing is trying to pass laws throughout the country that don’t just shoot the messenger, they seek to imprison the messenger.”

The proposals mandate that evidence of animal abuse be turned over to law enforcement within 48 hours, or face a financial penalty. Several of the bills bills also make it a crime to lie on slaughterhouse job applications, which activists commonly do in order to get footage like the content of a video published by the HSUS, embedded below.

Full Article

Obama to let U.S. spy agencies scour Americans’ finances

March 14, 2013 by  
Filed under Police State

 

NEW YORK/WASHINGTON (Reuters) – The Obama administration is drawing up plans to give all U.S. spy agencies full access to a massive database that contains financial data on American citizens and others who bank in the country, according to a Treasury Department document seen by Reuters.

The proposed plan represents a major step by U.S. intelligence agencies to spot and track down terrorist networks and crime syndicates by bringing together financial databanks, criminal records and military intelligence. The plan, which legal experts say is permissible under U.S. law, is nonetheless likely to trigger intense criticism from privacy advocates.

Financial institutions that operate in the United States are required by law to file reports of “suspicious customer activity,” such as large money transfers or unusually structured bank accounts, to Treasury’s Financial Crimes Enforcement Network (FinCEN).

The Federal Bureau of Investigation already has full access to the database. However, intelligence agencies, such as the Central Intelligence Agency and the National Security Agency, currently have to make case-by-case requests for information to FinCEN.

The Treasury plan would give spy agencies the ability to analyze more raw financial data than they have ever had before, helping them look for patterns that could reveal attack plots or criminal schemes.

The planning document, dated March 4, shows that the proposal is still in its early stages of development, and it is not known when implementation might begin.

Financial institutions file more than 15 million “suspicious activity reports” every year, according to Treasury. Banks, for instance, are required to report all personal cash transactions exceeding $10,000, as well as suspected incidents of money laundering, loan fraud, computer hacking or counterfeiting.

“For these reports to be of value in detecting money laundering, they must be accessible to law enforcement, counter-terrorism agencies, financial regulators, and the intelligence community,” said the Treasury planning document.

A Treasury spokesperson said U.S. law permits FinCEN to share information with intelligence agencies to help detect and thwart threats to national security, provided they adhere to safeguards outlined in the Bank Secrecy Act. “Law enforcement and intelligence community members with access to this information are bound by these safeguards,” the spokesperson said in a statement.

Some privacy watchdogs expressed concern about the plan when Reuters outlined it to them.

A move like the FinCEN proposal “raises concerns as to whether people could find their information in a file as a potential terrorist suspect without having the appropriate predicate for that and find themselves potentially falsely accused,” said Sharon Bradford Franklin, senior counsel for the Rule of Law Program at the Constitution Project, a non-profit watchdog group.

Despite these concerns, legal experts emphasize that this sharing of data is permissible under U.S. law. Specifically, banks’ suspicious activity reporting requirements are dictated by a combination of the Bank Secrecy Act and the USA PATRIOT Act, which offer some privacy safeguards.

National security experts also maintain that a robust system for sharing criminal, financial and intelligence data among agencies will improve their ability to identify those who plan attacks on the United States.

“It’s a war on money, war on corruption, on politically exposed persons, anti-money laundering, organized crime,” said Amit Kumar, who advised the United Nations on Taliban sanctions and is a fellow at the Democratic think tank Center for National Policy.

SUSPICIOUS ACTIVITY

The Treasury document outlines a proposal to link the FinCEN database with a computer network used by U.S. defense and law enforcement agencies to share classified information called the Joint Worldwide Intelligence Communications System.

The plan calls for the Office of the Director of National Intelligence – set up after 9/11 to foster greater collaboration among intelligence agencies – to work with Treasury. The Director of National Intelligence declined to comment.

More than 25,000 financial firms – including banks, securities dealers, casinos, and money and wire transfer agencies – routinely file “suspicious activity reports” to FinCEN. The requirements for filing are so strict that banks often over-report, so they cannot be accused of failing to disclose activity that later proves questionable. This over-reporting raises the possibility that the financial details of ordinary citizens could wind up in the hands of spy agencies.

Stephen Vladeck, a professor at American University’s Washington College of Law, said privacy advocates have already been pushing back against the increased data-sharing activities between government agencies that followed the September 11 attacks.

“One of the real pushes from the civil liberties community has been to move away from collection restrictions on the front end and put more limits on what the government can do once it has the information,” he said.

Rand Paul conducts filibuster in opposition to John Brennan, Obama’s drone policy

March 6, 2013 by  
Filed under Americas

One of the oldest and most storied traditions of the Senate made a sudden return to Capitol Hill on Wednesday when a junior senator seized control of the chamber with an hours-long filibuster involving rambling speeches aimed at blocking a vote on President Obama’s choice to lead the CIA.

Led by Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.) with help from other junior senators, the filibuster was aimed at drawing attention to deep concern on both sides of the aisle about the administration’s use of unmanned aerial drones in its fight against terrorists and whether the government would ever use them in the United States.

Shortly before noon, Paul — the scion of a political family at the heart of the libertarian movement — came to the Senate floor and declared his opposition to the nomination of John O. Brennan, Obama’s choice to lead the spy agency, who has overseen the drone program.

“I will speak until I can no longer speak,” Paul said as he began. “I will speak as long as it takes, until the alarm is sounded from coast to coast that our Constitution is important, that your rights to trial by jury are precious, that no American should be killed by a drone on American soil without first being charged with a crime, without first being found to be guilty by a court.”

Full Article

US judge orders release of two anarchists held for five months without charges

March 2, 2013 by  
Filed under Police State

After five months in prison for refusing to testify before a grand jury about the political opinions of their acquaintances, Katherine Olejnik and Matthew Duran are to be released from a federal prison in the US state of Washington today. A third man, Matthew Pfeiffer, remains incarcerated in order to “coerce” testimony from him.

Olejnik and Duran have been imprisoned since last September, while Pfeiffer was incarcerated last December. None of the three were accused of any criminal conduct. Instead they have been held on grounds of civil contempt of court for refusing to testify before a federal grand jury. Much of their time in prison was spent under solitary confinement.

Their imprisonment has been at the instigation of federal prosecutors in the Obama administration’s Justice Department.

The grand jury was convened to investigate “ongoing violent crime” relating to May Day protests last year in Seattle, during which minor acts of vandalism were committed.

Full Article

Video – Another Blogger Executed by Mexican Drug Cartel

February 28, 2013 by  
Filed under Americas

 

valleycentral.com

Over the past three years, people in Mexico and particularly the border State of Tamaulipas have turned to social media to stay informed about organized crime and its effects on the community.

But a video surfaced on YouTube on Wednesday claiming a man dressed in black and kneeling is a contributor of the social media outlet Valor Por Tamaulipas.

After he recites a letter warning social media users to stop reporting about organized crime groups, the man appears to be shot in the head.

UTB Professor Guadalupe Correa-Cabrer told Action 4 News that some have questioned the authenticity of this video.

“The Mexican authorities need to do this investigation, we cannot allege and I cannot allege this is true or this is fake,” Correa-Cabrera said. “(It’s) How they are creating fear through YouTube and through social media. (They’re) presenting images and saying, ‘if you do this, I’m going to kill you,’ and this is not the first time to terrorize social media users.”

Correa-Cabrera believes Mexican authorities have shown weakness when investigating either cyber threats or threats against journalists that have actually been carried out, like the killing of Nuevo Laredo journalist Maria Elizabeth Macias.

“The message that was written in the place that her body was left in Nuevo Laredo, was, ‘because of what you’re reporting in the social media,’” Correa-Cabrera said.

She adds protecting social media users falls on the Mexican government, authorities and users themselves, and these threats should be taken seriously.

“If somebody is taking time to tape a video, it means that there is an agenda there,” Correa-Cabrera said. “You want to generate fear, you want these people that are reporting to stop reporting and we need to protect these people.”

Be cautious she said, but hopes people won’t be silenced.

“People have to know, people have to have their right to inform and to be informed and freedom of expression has to be protected,” Correa-Cabrera said. “Information is going to allow society to ask government to do their work.”

 

Link to Article

 

NYC to Round Up Mentally Ill Before They Commit Crimes

February 23, 2013 by  
Filed under Police State

THIS is what we warned you about – and the TRUE Hegelian “Solution” to the Gun / Violence “Problem”. There is no trial, no jurors, no justice … Just whatever it takes to weed out “bad machines” (who are many times brilliant artists and free thinkers) using the excuse of “public Safety” – Stalin would have been proud! (sorry for all that Orwellian newspeak quotation marks!)

 

Via the New American

NYC to Round Up Mentally Ill Before They Commit Crimes

In its latest Big Brother endeavor, New York City has begun a program to round up the city’s mentally ill and ensure they are taking their court-ordered medications. The New York Post reports that police will be armed with a list of the most-wanted mentally ill and a tracking system, and will force those deemed ill to go to a hospital.

The new policy comes as a result of two recent subway deaths in which the victims were pushed onto the train tracks by mentally ill suspects.

“After the Queens subway attack, the [city] decided to take a proactive approach to track down the most dangerous mental-health patients that currently have mental-hygiene warrants” out for them, one law enforcement official said in the Post report.

The first incident involved a homeless man named Naeem Davis, who cited different motives for his pushing a complete stranger onto the tracks, including voices in his head and being angry at the loss of his favorite boots.

The second case involved assailant Erika Menendez, who targeted an Iranian man based on her misguided political convictions. She told the police that she targeted Sunando Sen and pushed him in front of an oncoming 7 train in Queens because she “hated Hindus and Muslims since 2001 since they put down the Twin Towers.” She added, “I have been beating them up since.”

There are currently 25 names on the most-wanted list of mentally ill. The process involves the issuance of a specific type of warrant that permits the police to arrest individuals, even if they have not committed a crime, simply for not attending court-ordered therapy.

The Washington Times reports:

The arrest warrants the police are pursuing do not mean the targets are wanted for crimes, but rather for avoiding court-ordered mental-health treatment, according to the Post. Police in the city’s Real Time Crime Center are tasked with the roundup using advanced technology. Once tracked down, the suspects then will be forcibly taken by detectives to hospitals for treatment.

A handful of police officers are currently assigned to the new policy, which began a few weeks ago. The program is a variation of an older policy. The New York Post explains:

In the past, the city Department of Health would ask cops for help finding mentally ill people who aren’t taking their court-mandated meds so they could be taken to clinics. But that only applied to those who had known addresses — and patients who went off the grid were rarely pursued, the sources said.

The city is now concerned it could be liable if one of those people goes off the rails and hurts someone — or themselves, the sources said.

The Health Department fears that these mentally ill patients could be dangerous. Now, “you have a family member who goes to the Department of Health and gives them the information. Then they go to the Police Department, and together, the DOH person and the police go out and try to track down these people,” said a city official. “They’re just trying to get these people help.”

“All of these patients are receiving treatment for mental-health conditions,” said Department of Health spokesman Sam Miller. “If they do not receive sustained treatment … they could pose some risk to themselves, family members or others.”

The policy has attracted criticism from civil libertarians who view it as unconstitutional government overreach.

According to Judge Andrew Napolitano, the policy is “clearly unconstitutional because the Constitution says the only way you can arrest someone is if you see them committing a crime or a probable cause to believe they have committed, not are going to commit, but have committed a crime.”

Regarding the mentally ill, Napolitano contends that only very specific exceptions can be made to those criteria. “Only those who are mentally ill and are in imminent danger of harm to themselves and others can be in the category of candidates for arrest. Anything short of that, the person cannot be arrested without an order from a judge,” he explained.

“That’s why we have a Second Amendment. So we can protect ourselves,” said Napolitano.

Napolitano sums up the constitutional dilemma created by the policy.

“We do not have a system of government that lets the government predict who’s going to do the wrong thing and arrest them before they do it,” Napolitano concludes. “The police should be there to keep us safe, the MTA should operate subways and subway platforms that are safe, but you can’t arrest groups of people because of what some 1 or 2 amongst their number are likely to do. That’s what they did in Eastern Europe and we overthrew those governments.”

Additionally, some critics are concerned by the forced issuance of psychotropic drugs and assert that they do not necessarily correct mental illness but exacerbate it.

Throughout the last decade, a number of notorious school shooters have been found to be either on or withdrawing from antidepressants, known as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI), including Columbine shooter Eric Harris, who was taking the powerful Luvox; Jeffrey Weise, who killed 10 students at Red Lake High School while on Prozac; and Kip Kinkel, who, during Prozac withdrawal, killed his parents and then went on a shooting spree at his high school.

“In virtually every mass school shooting during the past 15 years, the shooter has been on or in withdrawal from psychiatric drugs,” writes Lawrence Hunter of the Social Security Institute. “Yet, federal and state governments continue to ignore the connection between psychiatric drugs and murderous violence, preferring instead to exploit these tragedies in an oppressive and unconstitutional power grab to snatch guns away from innocent, law-abiding people.”

The connection between psychiatric drugs and violence is not limited to school shootings, but has also been seen in the high-profile cases of John Hinckley, Jr., who attempted to assassinate President Ronald Reagan, and Ted Kaczynski, the “Unabomber,” who killed three and injured 23.

Meanwhile, those enforcing New York’s new policy are concerned about the logistics of the scheme, most notably that it will be difficult to track down the homeless on the most-wanted list. “There’s no rhyme or reason to their craziness,” a law enforcement source told the Post.

also see:

Avraham Shifrin in his book “The First Guidebook to Prisons and Concentration Camps of the Soviet Union” (http://www.amazon.com/First-Guidebook-Prisons-Concentration-Soviet/dp/0553013920/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1361501573&sr=1-1&keywords=avraham+shifrin ) described the psychiatric prisons of the Soviet Union that existed over thirty years ago already. Prisoners were mentally “communized” there by using pain-drug-hypnosis. No news exists regarding the discontinuation of such prisons.

Atlanta police officers arrested for allegedly protecting cocaine traffickers

February 13, 2013 by  
Filed under Police State

While ruining people’s lives for a pinch of pot, not wearing a seat belt, or having 2 beers with dinner and driving home… these Cops remind us why the state system is full of corruption and hypocrisy.

The APD has removed Senior Police Officer Kelvin Allen from service, effective immediately

Creative Loafing (Atlanta’s “Alternative” paper)

Federal agents have arrested ten police officers who worked in the metro Atlanta area for their alleged involvement in “multiple drug transactions” where they “took thousands in drug payoffs.” Five civilians were also apprehended as the result of a yearlong undercover operation investigating public corruption.

At a press conference this afternoon, United States Attorney Sally Yates said that officers were charged a range of offenses. Officers involved worked for a number of police departments, including Atlanta, Forest Park, DeKalb County, Stone Mountain, MARTA, and the DeKalb Sheriff’s Office.

Atlanta Police spokesman Carlos Campos said in a statement that Senior Police Officer Kelvin Allen was a 20-year veteran who recently patrolled in Zone 6.

“The revelation of an Atlanta Police officer’s alleged involvement in a federal drug trafficking sting is disturbing, said Campos. “The Department has been, and will continue to be, cooperative with federal authorities to ensure that Atlanta Police officers involved in any illegal activity are brought to justice. Officers are held to the highest levels of accountability, and this alleged conduct violates our standards.”

MARTA Officer Marquez Holmes had served with the transit agency’s police department for a decade. Spokeswoman Cara Hodgson added that MARTA “will not tolerate corruption in its ranks” and will fully cooperate with the U.S. Attorney’s investigation.

The Federal Bureau of Investigation and Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives worked together throughout this operation, which began as they looked into a local street gang’s drug trafficking. Agents uncovered the corruption early in the case and proceeded to follow police who were offering protection, security, and vehicle escorts for large cocaine transactions. Yates said payoffs were as high as $7,000.

She also went on to describe accounts of “dirty cops” who wore their uniforms, drove patrol cars, and carried their issued firearms while assisting in drug transactions. The officers involved were a combination of men and women, some of whom ranked “as high as sergeant.” She added that the civilians arrested today served as middlemen who in some cases helped recruit the police officers.

In addition, she called the corruption “very disturbing” and “abhorrent,” but insisted that it was not symbolic of the way thousands of other honest cops in the metro area conduct their work.

Earlier today, WSB-TV reporter Mark Winne said that suspects were brought to the FBI’s Atlanta field office in handcuffs this morning. He added that this case may very well be “the biggest police corruption scandal at least since the early ’90s.”

UPDATE, 4:23 p.m.: The Atlanta Journal-Constitution just posted a press release from Yates’ office that details the allegations, which you can find after the jump.

DeKalb County Police DepartmentBetween October 2011 and November 2011, DeKalb County Police Officer Dennis Duren, working together with Bass, provided protection for what he and Bass believed were four separate transactions in the Atlanta area that involved multiple kilograms of cocaine. Duren and Bass accepted cash payments totaling $8,800 for these services. During the transactions, Duren was dressed in his DeKalb County Police uniform and carried a gun in a holster on his belt, as he patrolled on foot in the parking lots in which the undercover sales took place. After the first two transactions, Duren allegedly offered to drive his patrol vehicle to future transactions for an additional $800 fee, and afterward received an additional $800 in cash for using his patrol vehicle in the final transaction in November 2011. Duren and Bass are each charged with conspiring to commit extortion by accepting bribe payments and attempted possession with intent to distribute more than five kilograms of cocaine. Duren also is charged with possessing a firearm in furtherance of a drug trafficking crime.

Between January and February 2013, DeKalb County Police Officer Dorian Williams, working together with Mannery and Bass, provided protection for what he and Mannery believed were three separate transactions in the Atlanta area that involved multiple kilograms of cocaine. Williams and Mannery accepted cash payments totaling $18,000 for these services. During the transactions, Williams was dressed in his DeKalb County Police uniform and carried a gun in a holster on his belt, and he patrolled the parking lots in which the undercover sales took place in his DeKalb Police vehicle. During a meeting between the three transactions, Williams allegedly instructed Bass to remove any cocaine from the scene if Williams had to shoot someone during the upcoming sale. In another meeting, Williams suggested that future drug transactions should take place in the parking lot of a local high school during the afternoon, so that the exchange of backpacks containing drugs and money would not look suspicious. Williams and Mannery are each charged with conspiring to commit extortion by accepting bribe payments and attempted possession with intent to distribute more than five kilograms of cocaine.

Stone Mountain Police Department

Between April and September 2012, Stone Mountain Police Officer Denoris Carter, working together with Mannery, provided protection for what he and Mannery believed were five separate transactions in the Atlanta area that involved multiple kilograms of cocaine. For these services, Carter and Mannery accepted cash payments totaling $23,500. For all five transactions, Carter dressed in his Stone Mountain Police uniform. In four of the deals, he arrived in his police cruiser and either patrolled or parked in the parking lots in which the undercover sales took place and watched the transactions. During the final transaction in September 2012, Carter was on foot, displaying a firearm in a holster on his belt, and he walked through the parking lot in which the transaction took place and watched the participants. Finally, during one of the transactions, Carter agreed to escort the purchaser of the sham cocaine in his police vehicle for several miles, until the purchaser reached Highway 78. Carter is charged with conspiring to commit extortion by accepting bribe payments, attempted possession with intent to distribute more than five kilograms of cocaine, and possessing a firearm in furtherance of a drug trafficking crime.

Atlanta Police Department

Between June and August 2012, Atlanta Police officer Kelvin D. Allen, working together with Coss, provided protection for what he and Coss believed were three separate transactions in the Atlanta area that involved multiple kilograms of cocaine. Allen and Coss accepted cash payments totaling $10,500 for their services. For two transactions, Allen dressed in his Atlanta Police uniform and carried a gun in a holster on his belt. Allen patrolled on foot in parking lots in which the undercover sales took place and appeared to be monitoring the transactions. During a meeting after the three transactions, a cooperator gave Allen and Coss each a $1,000 bonus payment in return for protecting the three transactions. Allen and Coss are each charged with conspiring to commit extortion by accepting bribe payments and attempted possession with intent to distribute more than five kilograms of cocaine. Allen also is charged with possessing a firearm in furtherance of a drug trafficking crime.

MARTA Police Department

Between August and November 2012, MARTA Police Department Officer Marquez Holmes, working together with Coss, provided protection for what he and Coss believed were four separate transactions in the Atlanta area that involved multiple kilograms of cocaine. For these services, Holmes and Coss accepted cash payments totaling $9,000. During the transactions, Holmes was dressed in his MARTA Police uniform and carried a gun in a holster on his belt. In two of the transactions, Holmes patrolled on foot in the parking lots in which the undercover sales took place and monitored the transactions. During the other two deals, Holmes drove to the site in his MARTA police cruiser and parked next to the vehicles in which the undercover drug sale took place. Holmes is charged with conspiring to commit extortion by accepting bribe payments, attempted possession with intent to distribute more than five kilograms of cocaine, and possessing a firearm in furtherance of a drug trafficking crime.

Forest Park Police Department

Between October to December 2012, Forest Park Police Sergeants Victor Middlebrook and Andrew Monroe, sometimes working alone and at other times together, provided protection for what they believed were six separate drug deals in the Atlanta area, all involving multiple kilograms of cocaine. For his services in the first four transactions, Middlebook accepted cash payments totaling $13,800. During these transactions, Middlebrook wore plain clothes, but displayed his badge and a firearm in a holster on his belt. He patrolled on foot in the parking lots nearby the vehicles in which the undercover sales took place and appeared to be monitoring the transactions. For the final two transactions, both Middlebrook and Monroe provided security and were given cash payments totaling $10,400. Middlebrook again monitored the transactions on foot in plain clothes while displaying his badge and gun, while Monroe watched from his vehicle in the parking lot and afterward escorted the purchaser of the sham cocaine for several miles. Middlebrook and Monroe are charged with conspiring to commit extortion by accepting bribe payments and attempted possession with intent to distribute more than five kilograms of cocaine; Middlebrook is also charged with possession of a firearm in furtherance of a drug trafficking crime.

DeKalb County Sheriff’s Office

In January 2013, former DeKalb County Sheriff Jail Officer Monyette McLaurin, working together with Harvey, provided protection for what they believed were two separate drug transactions in the Atlanta area that involved multiple kilograms of cocaine. Harvey already had provided security for two undercover drug transactions in December 2012, falsely representing that he was a DeKalb County detention officer and wearing a black shirt with the letters “SHERIFF” printed across the back during the transactions. Harvey then stated that he knew other police officers who wanted to protect drug deals, and in January 2013 he introduced McLaurin as one of these officers. During a meeting to discuss future drug transactions, McLaurin falsely represented that he was a deputy employed by the DeKalb Sheriff’s office, even though his position as a jail officer ended in 2011. McLaurin and Harvey further stated during this meeting that they may need to kill another person who knew that Harvey had protected drug deals, if this person reported the activity to others.

During the two transactions in January 2013, McLaurin was dressed in a DeKalb County Sheriff’s Office uniform with a badge, and he carried a gun in a holster on his belt. He accompanied the undercover seller of the cocaine to pick up the drugs from a warehouse, counted the kilograms the seller received, and stood outside the purchaser’s vehicle during the actual transaction. He further discussed with the seller whether they should agree upon a signal for the seller to indicate that the sale had gone awry, requiring McLaurin to shoot the drug buyer. For their services, McLaurin and Harvey were paid $12,000 in cash. McLaurin and Harvey are each charged with attempted possession with intent to distribute more than five kilograms of cocaine and with possessing a firearm in furtherance of a drug trafficking crime.

Later in January 2013, McLaurin and Harvey introduced a second former DeKalb County Sheriff’s Jail Officer, Chase Valentine, to help provide security for future drug deals. Like McLaurin, Valentine falsely represented himself to be a DeKalb County Sheriff’s Deputy, even though his position as a jail officer ended in 2010. Together with Harvey, Valentine provided security for one undercover drug transaction on January 17, 2013, during which he wore a DeKalb Sheriff’s Office uniform and a pistol in a holster on his belt. During the transaction, Valentine escorted the seller to pick up the sham cocaine, counted the number of kilograms delivered, and stood outside the purchaser’s car during the actual transaction. For these services, Valentine received $6,000 in cash. Valentine is charged with attempted possession with intent to distribute more than 500 grams of cocaine and possession of a firearm in furtherance of a drug trafficking crime.

Federal Protective Services

In November 2012, Sharon Peters, who was a contract officer for the Federal Protective Services, worked together with Mannery to provide protection for what they believed were two separate transactions in the Atlanta area that involved multiple kilograms of cocaine. For these services, Peters and Mannery accepted cash payments totaling $14,000. For both transactions, Peters parked her vehicle nearby the cars where the sham drugs and money were exchanged, and watched the transactions. Before both transactions, Peters told others that she had her pistol with her in the car. Peters is charged with attempted possession with intent to distribute more than five kilograms of cocaine, and possession of a firearm in furtherance of a drug trafficking crime.

Imposter Clayton County Police Officer

Between December 2012 and January 2013, Alexander B. Hill falsely represented himself to be an officer with the Clayton County Police Department while providing security for what he believed were three separate drug transactions in the Atlanta area that involved multiple kilograms of cocaine. During an initial meeting, Hill wore a uniform that appeared to be from Clayton Police, but during the transactions he wore plain clothes and, for at least the first deal, a badge displayed on his belt. For these services, Hill received payments totaling $9,000 in cash. Hill charged with attempted possession with intent to distribute more than five kilograms of cocaine and with possession of a firearm in furtherance of a drug trafficking crime.

Note: This original version of this story has been edited in order to include additional information.

Arkansas town’s martial law plan

January 30, 2013 by  
Filed under Police State

Original: Following a rise in violent crime in Paragould, an Arkansas town of around 26,000 residents, the mayor and police chief announced that starting this month police in SWAT gear carrying AR-15s would patrol the streets.

“If you’re out walking, we’re going to stop you, ask why you’re out walking, and check for your ID,” police chief Todd Stovall told a December town hall meeting. As if to render the implementation of a visible police state more palatable, Stovall assured residents that police stops would not be based on any profiling: “We’re going to do it to everybody,” he said.

Full Article

Gulf cartel member who threatened to kill Hidalgo County Sheriff turns himself in (?)

January 24, 2013 by  
Filed under Americas

themonitor.com

EDINBURG — He told Spanish-language broadcasters he was a cartel-connected killer of a Border Patrol agent.

He told authorities he was a former Mexican police officer whom organized crime tried to knock off south of the border — and who ultimately turned himself in to avoid hit men in Mexico with connections to the Hidalgo County sheriff.

Then on Thursday, Gustavo Lozano told a judge he’d been at fault.

“I am sorry for what I’ve done,” Lozano told Justice of the Peace Bobby Contreras in Spanish at his arraignment hearing at the Hidalgo County Jail.

Lozano was wanted by the Sheriff’s Office for making threats against Sheriff Lupe Treviño and a telephone dispatcher July 25.

On Wednesday morning, Lozano turned himself in to federal authorities at the Hidalgo-Reynosa International Bridge who rushed him to a local hospital to treat what the sheriff said is a self-inflicted cut to his neck — not the physical vestiges of a cartel attempt on his life, as Lozano told authorities. He has been under close supervision by authorities since.

He was formally charged by Contreras with two counts of making terroristic threats against a public official and his bond was set at $2 million. According to the criminal complaint filed against Lozano, he had identified himself as a former police officer named “Genaro Garza” and said he would kill Treviño and his family for opening an investigation against him. Authorities tracked the phone number used to Lozano and “further learned Lozano has a history of placing threatening phone calls to law enforcement,” the complaint states.

 

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